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Art in the Professions



What is it?


Ever since humans started to explore the world around them, they have tried to come up with ways to record what they have seen and found. We capture the movement and grace of the animals we have hunted on cave walls. And when we need to communicate to each other, we start with a picture. The field of biomedical communications really started from these humble but tremendous beginnings and it has exploded into a vibrant and constantly-evolving field. Biomedical communications is a bridge of technical know-how that spans the body of scientific knowledge with artistic expression to get the message across. This means anything that you can think of that involves using art to get a message across can be technically considered as biomedical communication. The sky is really the limit.

The art of life is roughly divided into medical illustrations and biological illustrations, but the borders are usually blurred in the industry today as artists trained in one field may also decide to pick up freelance work in a related field. In general, medical illustrators are held to a higher, more stringent entry criteria as compared to biological illustrators.


The beginning of a field:


In the beginning, artists are generally hired to illustrate story books and text books. No one could accurately trace the very beginnings of biological illustration as a career. The real turning point probably took place with Darwin publishing his The Voyage on the Beagle in 1839 with his lushly hand-drawn illustrations of the wildlife he had seen during these voyages. Closely following that, German polymath Ernst Haeckel published a volume of over 100 hand-drawn and full-coloured lithographic prints covering hundreds of plant and sea life known as Kunstformen der Natur (English: Art Forms in Nature)in 1904. It described some animals that no one had seen before, and thus leading the way of using art to represent the amazing world that we live in.

A number of amazingly detailed anatomical folios exist that dates all the way back to ancient times. The Renaissance gave us the first glimpse of what medical illustrations could be in volumes such as Andreas Vesalius's De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septum in 1542 and Leonardo Da Vinci's technical drawings which used cut-away and exploded views that we still use today. Medical illustration as a profession started in the late 1890s with Max Brödel. He was a talented artist from Leipzig who was brought to the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine to illustrate for a team of talented surgeons and physicians as a way to record experimental and exemplery new techniques in medicine as well as serve as education material. In his career, Brödel became a pioneer and an inventor himself, creating new technique such as Carbon Dust to better suit the demands of his new profession. In 1911, Brödel became the leading force and the first president of the first academic department of medical illustration, which exists to this day.


What's considered as Biomedical communication?


As our understanding of the world around us evolve, we have developed a lot more ways to communicate as well. Today, the field of biomedical communications encompass the very big and the very small, the very new and the very old. Traditionally, biomedical communication consists of 2D illustrations (both traditional and digital) and photography. They are usually used to illustrate text books,posters, treatises, nature guides, scientific journals, museums, botanical gardens, zoos and aquariums. However as our media expands, the scope of biomedical communication also grows to include 3D models, animation, instructional videotapes and films, web-based media, computer-assisted learning programs, even high-fidelity virtual-reality simulations. These media find their way into classrooms and operating theatres as well as high-stakes drug companies and bio-engineering firms. We also regularly consume some forms of biomedical communication in our daily media as well. Think of all the "CSI animations" in popular medical and crime shows. That's yet another way to bring the expertise of biological and medical advances right to your doorstep.


How do I get involved?


Biological illustrators can enter the field without a specific degree, however most people still do have some form of formal training. Having a related degree may also increase your chance of being employed as well. Biological illustration can be pursued as a degree in the undergraduate, graduate, and technical college levels. Preparation for a biological illustration career can include a background or art or science, or a combination of both. Skills development in biological illustration can involve two-dimensional art, animation, graphic design and sculpture. Compared medical illustration, biological illustration have a more limited employment opportunity. Therefore a lot of artists involved in the field will do freelance jobs and short-term contracts. Many of them take up commercial graphic design as well as biological illustration.

Most medical illustrators in the profession have a Master's degree from an accredited graduate program in medical illustration or another advanced degree in either science or the arts. Currently there are five accredited Programs in North America: The Biomedical Visualization Program in the University of Illinois, The Medical Illustration graduate program at the Medical College of Georgia, The Biomedical Communications program in the University of Toronto, The Biomedical Communications graduate program at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the Department of Arts as Applied to Medicine in Johns Hopkins Medical Institution in Baltimore.

The best place to start, however, is to check out the AMI's website. The AMI regularly publishes the Medical Illustration Sourcebook. This book is usually distributed annually to comapnies and professionals who regularly hire medical/scientifi image makers for various projects. A companion source book also contain searchable illustration, animaltion and multi-media portfolios from hundreds of artists in the field.


Examples:


1. Flipping through the pages of ancient medical texts: archive.nlm.nih.gov/proj/ttp/b…(Courtesy of the National Institute of Health, USA)
2. The remastered facsimile of the 1918 edition of Gray's Anatomy: www.bartleby.com/107/ (Courtesy of Bartleby.com)
3. Ars Anatomica: Imagining the Renaissance Body: www.arsanatomica.lib.ed.ac.uk/… (Contains examples of Renaissance medical illustrations)
4. Some pages of Haeckel's lithographs can be seen here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunstfor…

Anatomy sketch - Profile by KayIglerART Human Anatomy by BBARTEL Anatomy by ReneCampbellArt Sci Illustration 1: E. achemon by MissNysha Fighting Giraffe Weevils by bigredsharks Order Tetraodontiformes by Edestoid Brachiosaurus by Monster-Man-08 Yucatan Palmae by albertoguerra Gomphotherium angustidens by WillemSvdMerwe Raphus cucullatus by Iguana-Teteia The Rat King: unnamed zygocercous cercaria by The-Episiarch


Resource and Bibliography:


1. The Association of Medical Illustrators: ami.org/ (Covers the history of medical illustration, qualification to enter the field and available certified programs in North America. The FAQ also lays out answers to common questions including average annual wage.)
2. "I am a medical illustrator" by Monique Gildersen, May 2002. Published in the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/…
3. "How to become a medical illustrator" Academic Invest.  www.academicinvest.com/arts-ca…
4. Guild of Natural Science Illustrators: gnsi.org/ (Covers history of scientific illustration, some entrance criteria and portfolio requirements and article resources.)
5. Wikipedia: "Medical Illustration" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_… "Biological Illustration" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biologic… and "Medical Photography" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_…
6. The BioCommunications Association: www.bca.org/ (Professional association for all fields of BioCommunication. A contest is held every year called BioImages. Past winners can be seen on the website.)
7. The Journal of BioCommunication: www.jbiocommunication.org/ (Published by The BCA, this is a monthly journal showcasing the advances and future directions of the field.)


Questions for you:


Bullet; Blue  Are you surprised at the scope of BioCommunications around you?
Bullet; Blue Have you ever considered a career in BioCommunications?
Bullet; Blue What do you think of the entry criteria? Is the bar too high? Too harsh? Or not enough?

The Art of Life: Biomedical Communications
This is a new article for :iconprojecteducate: and it's "Art in the Professions" week. The last one was an unprecendented success. I hope this will will open more doors for people who are interested in pursuing art as a career!
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78 deviations
The strongest snowglobe by SinistrosePhosphate
The strongest snowglobe
This project took me months. But now it's finally done... I'd forgotten to take more photos of it... Chyrno (Number 0) 

What you are seeing here is the embodiment of the (9) ball itself - it's a bona fide, hand-assembled snow globe featuring the one and only, strongest ice fairy, Cirno (From the Touhou Universe.) She hovers just slightly above her frozen domain and with a smug smirk on her face, she can make her world snow in a shake of your hand.

... go on, I dare you. Chyrno (Number 9) 


_____________________________________________________________________
Production Notes:  
1. Made from a Seedling Snow Globe set (Get your own here: www.amazon.ca/Seedling-Make-Yo…) , miniature chibi Cirno figurine, glitter and confetti, miscellaneous crystals, pearls, Christmas decorations and an upcycled candle holder. And glue. Lots and lots of glue. 
2. Size: 10.2 x 11.4 x 20.3 cm (not including the base)
3. Took: Much longer than anticipated.
4. Picture credit: rebecca (naononakukoroni)
5. Cirno is a member of the Touhou Universe, created by ZUN and Team Shanghai Alice, 1996-2015.
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Maid of Paranoia by SinistrosePhosphate
Maid of Paranoia
"Maid Maleen" is one of the lesser-known German fairy-tales collected by the Brothers Grimm. The story starts with the virtuous princess who was locked away in a tower for 7 years because her father refused to let her marry the prince she loved. And it culminated in one of most mystifying sequences ever recorded in a fairy tale. The maid was forced to dress up as a bride and take the place of the true bride in the marriage ceremony. On the way to the chapel, she muttered three short rhymed under her breath. The first was directed to the nettle plant and how she had eaten it raw (i.e. as a peasant eating wild greens.) But the second and third rhyme were much more intriguing.

"Foot-bridge, do not break; I am not the true bride."
"Church door, break not; I am not the true bride."

While the story had a typical "fairy tale ending", the questions raised by these rhymes make us wonder what kind of thoughts must have ran through Maid Maleen's mind. What kind of fear and paranoia would drive someone to pray that the bridge under her foot will not break and the church door would not topple over her head... just because she was not the true bride?

One aspect of persecutory delusions is the "Querulant Paranoia". The person suffering from it believe that he or she is being persecuted by everything and everyone around him or her. This may include inanimate objects as well. In Maid Maleen's case, the feeling that inanimate objects have a will and that they would rise up against her (or fall from beneath her feet) just because she was a pretender is a form of querulant paranoia. She prayed against a threat that only exist in her mind.

Artist's Note:
1. Completed over 3 days. Pencil, Sharpie marker, medium point roller ball pen, extra-fine wet-erase marker.
2. Scanned and contrast corrected by Photoshop CS4. 
3. Strathmore Drawing Paper, Series 300, 70lbs (114gsm)
4. Produced for :iconmadmen-asylum: for their "Longest Night" campaign. More information here: fav.me/d8nws9x
5. To read the fairy tale for yourself: ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/g/grimm…

P.S. I'm a judge! So I can't actually win this contest. But please join in. And if you like what I do... I offer a commission as a prize to the first place winner.
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:iconprojecteducate:
:iconprojecteducate:


Art in the Professions



What is it?


Ever since humans started to explore the world around them, they have tried to come up with ways to record what they have seen and found. We capture the movement and grace of the animals we have hunted on cave walls. And when we need to communicate to each other, we start with a picture. The field of biomedical communications really started from these humble but tremendous beginnings and it has exploded into a vibrant and constantly-evolving field. Biomedical communications is a bridge of technical know-how that spans the body of scientific knowledge with artistic expression to get the message across. This means anything that you can think of that involves using art to get a message across can be technically considered as biomedical communication. The sky is really the limit.

The art of life is roughly divided into medical illustrations and biological illustrations, but the borders are usually blurred in the industry today as artists trained in one field may also decide to pick up freelance work in a related field. In general, medical illustrators are held to a higher, more stringent entry criteria as compared to biological illustrators.


The beginning of a field:


In the beginning, artists are generally hired to illustrate story books and text books. No one could accurately trace the very beginnings of biological illustration as a career. The real turning point probably took place with Darwin publishing his The Voyage on the Beagle in 1839 with his lushly hand-drawn illustrations of the wildlife he had seen during these voyages. Closely following that, German polymath Ernst Haeckel published a volume of over 100 hand-drawn and full-coloured lithographic prints covering hundreds of plant and sea life known as Kunstformen der Natur (English: Art Forms in Nature)in 1904. It described some animals that no one had seen before, and thus leading the way of using art to represent the amazing world that we live in.

A number of amazingly detailed anatomical folios exist that dates all the way back to ancient times. The Renaissance gave us the first glimpse of what medical illustrations could be in volumes such as Andreas Vesalius's De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septum in 1542 and Leonardo Da Vinci's technical drawings which used cut-away and exploded views that we still use today. Medical illustration as a profession started in the late 1890s with Max Brödel. He was a talented artist from Leipzig who was brought to the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine to illustrate for a team of talented surgeons and physicians as a way to record experimental and exemplery new techniques in medicine as well as serve as education material. In his career, Brödel became a pioneer and an inventor himself, creating new technique such as Carbon Dust to better suit the demands of his new profession. In 1911, Brödel became the leading force and the first president of the first academic department of medical illustration, which exists to this day.


What's considered as Biomedical communication?


As our understanding of the world around us evolve, we have developed a lot more ways to communicate as well. Today, the field of biomedical communications encompass the very big and the very small, the very new and the very old. Traditionally, biomedical communication consists of 2D illustrations (both traditional and digital) and photography. They are usually used to illustrate text books,posters, treatises, nature guides, scientific journals, museums, botanical gardens, zoos and aquariums. However as our media expands, the scope of biomedical communication also grows to include 3D models, animation, instructional videotapes and films, web-based media, computer-assisted learning programs, even high-fidelity virtual-reality simulations. These media find their way into classrooms and operating theatres as well as high-stakes drug companies and bio-engineering firms. We also regularly consume some forms of biomedical communication in our daily media as well. Think of all the "CSI animations" in popular medical and crime shows. That's yet another way to bring the expertise of biological and medical advances right to your doorstep.


How do I get involved?


Biological illustrators can enter the field without a specific degree, however most people still do have some form of formal training. Having a related degree may also increase your chance of being employed as well. Biological illustration can be pursued as a degree in the undergraduate, graduate, and technical college levels. Preparation for a biological illustration career can include a background or art or science, or a combination of both. Skills development in biological illustration can involve two-dimensional art, animation, graphic design and sculpture. Compared medical illustration, biological illustration have a more limited employment opportunity. Therefore a lot of artists involved in the field will do freelance jobs and short-term contracts. Many of them take up commercial graphic design as well as biological illustration.

Most medical illustrators in the profession have a Master's degree from an accredited graduate program in medical illustration or another advanced degree in either science or the arts. Currently there are five accredited Programs in North America: The Biomedical Visualization Program in the University of Illinois, The Medical Illustration graduate program at the Medical College of Georgia, The Biomedical Communications program in the University of Toronto, The Biomedical Communications graduate program at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the Department of Arts as Applied to Medicine in Johns Hopkins Medical Institution in Baltimore.

The best place to start, however, is to check out the AMI's website. The AMI regularly publishes the Medical Illustration Sourcebook. This book is usually distributed annually to comapnies and professionals who regularly hire medical/scientifi image makers for various projects. A companion source book also contain searchable illustration, animaltion and multi-media portfolios from hundreds of artists in the field.


Examples:


1. Flipping through the pages of ancient medical texts: archive.nlm.nih.gov/proj/ttp/b…(Courtesy of the National Institute of Health, USA)
2. The remastered facsimile of the 1918 edition of Gray's Anatomy: www.bartleby.com/107/ (Courtesy of Bartleby.com)
3. Ars Anatomica: Imagining the Renaissance Body: www.arsanatomica.lib.ed.ac.uk/… (Contains examples of Renaissance medical illustrations)
4. Some pages of Haeckel's lithographs can be seen here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunstfor…

Anatomy sketch - Profile by KayIglerART Human Anatomy by BBARTEL Anatomy by ReneCampbellArt Sci Illustration 1: E. achemon by MissNysha Fighting Giraffe Weevils by bigredsharks Order Tetraodontiformes by Edestoid Brachiosaurus by Monster-Man-08 Yucatan Palmae by albertoguerra Gomphotherium angustidens by WillemSvdMerwe Raphus cucullatus by Iguana-Teteia The Rat King: unnamed zygocercous cercaria by The-Episiarch


Resource and Bibliography:


1. The Association of Medical Illustrators: ami.org/ (Covers the history of medical illustration, qualification to enter the field and available certified programs in North America. The FAQ also lays out answers to common questions including average annual wage.)
2. "I am a medical illustrator" by Monique Gildersen, May 2002. Published in the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/…
3. "How to become a medical illustrator" Academic Invest.  www.academicinvest.com/arts-ca…
4. Guild of Natural Science Illustrators: gnsi.org/ (Covers history of scientific illustration, some entrance criteria and portfolio requirements and article resources.)
5. Wikipedia: "Medical Illustration" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_… "Biological Illustration" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biologic… and "Medical Photography" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_…
6. The BioCommunications Association: www.bca.org/ (Professional association for all fields of BioCommunication. A contest is held every year called BioImages. Past winners can be seen on the website.)
7. The Journal of BioCommunication: www.jbiocommunication.org/ (Published by The BCA, this is a monthly journal showcasing the advances and future directions of the field.)


Questions for you:


Bullet; Blue  Are you surprised at the scope of BioCommunications around you?
Bullet; Blue Have you ever considered a career in BioCommunications?
Bullet; Blue What do you think of the entry criteria? Is the bar too high? Too harsh? Or not enough?

deviantID

SinistrosePhosphate
C. J. C.
Artist | Hobbyist | Varied
Canada
Greetings.
I am not an articulate person. But I'll try.

Yours truly was born in 1981, Taipei, Taiwan.
Moved to Canada in 1993.
During the day, he's "Dextrose Phosphate": a recently-employed resident physician trying to look sharp while learning how to save lives. At night, he becomes "Sinistrose Phosphate": an amateurish busy-body who dreams of one day getting a hang at this "art" business.

... in my humble opinion, neither one's going great, really.

Despite all that... thanks a million for visiting my little proverbial hole in the wall (of the Internet). Stay a while, have some tea, leave a comment... maybe even start a conversation.

I'm not an articulate person, but I will most definitely try.

Current Residence: Newfoundland, Canada
Favourite genre of music: Various (with exception to Rap and Country)
Operating System: Windows 7
MP3 player of choice: Windows Media Player
Shell of choice: ... Nautilus?
Wallpaper of choice: Whatever the landlord puts on the walls.
Skin of choice: My own, definitely. I'm born with it.
Personal Quote: "One apple a day... keeps me and my ilk away."
Interests

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:iconfmarockssomuch:
FMARocksSoMuch Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks a bunch for the llama hun~! =D :iconbunnyglompplz:

sorry for the late reply btw, the day after having a really nice birthday dinner with my family, I woke up with a steaming cold..! so I've been off for like... a day or 2... ^^;
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconiguana-teteia:
Iguana-Teteia Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Professional Filmographer
Thanks for the watch :D
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconsirdeviticus:
SirDeviticus Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
THE THUMBNAIL IS GONE
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(1 Reply)
:iconghostshow:
GhostShow Featured By Owner 6 days ago
Welp, I'm back and settled for now. Aaah... - - 
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconandorada:
Andorada Featured By Owner May 14, 2015
Hearts In Colour       Hearts In Colour 

                         Thank you for joining
                      
                          TandemFeatures!                                      
                              
Hearts In Colour        Hearts In Colour
Reply
:iconlcneko-tan:
LCNeko-tan Featured By Owner May 10, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Hello~ I just wanted to say you're one of the best in the entire world. :nod:
And the world is a very big place! ^¬^ No chain mail, no reposts.
This is me speaking from the heart. :heart:
You're amazing, have a beautiful day. :hug:
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconillydragonfly:
IllyDragonfly Featured By Owner May 7, 2015   Writer
Hi! I practically finished my inspiration work for 'Pediophobia' hour.
Will you use The Nutcracker as inspiration for this theme, maybe? :)
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconjohnnyandme:
JohnnyandMe Featured By Owner May 2, 2015  Hobbyist
Is heighten senses a sign of a psychotic episode about to happen in schizophrenia?
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(1 Reply)
:iconshu-maat:
Shu-Maat Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
A random hug for you, my dear. I hope life is treating you well! :hug:
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(1 Reply)
:iconjohnnyandme:
JohnnyandMe Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2015  Hobbyist
I was wondering is it normal to blackout when your in a psychotic episode? Cause sometimes I have blackout and don't know if it is cause of psychotic episodes. The last time I blackout it was in February of 2014 and I attacked someone at the hospital. I remember other times I blackout like when I was 17 I was just standing g next to a Electric fence and next thing I know I'm laughing cause it shocked me or a time when I was a kid I was maybe between eight and ten years old I remember mom pulling the car over and getting out of the car but the next thing I know my mom is on top of me trying to get me to stop attacking her. Has this happened to anyone else?
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